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Domestic

Violence

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Paternity

Cases

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Divorce

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Post Judgment

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Abuse occurs in many different ways such as physical, sexual, emotional and financially. In some cases, there is a combination of these forms of abuse occurring at once. And in some subtle cases, there is a partner who just won’t leave your residence preventing you from ending the relationship. Depending on the unique facts of your circumstances, there are legal actions you can take to protect yourself against abuse. 

For instance, you may choose to file a Restraining Order which is referred to as an “Injunction” under Florida law. There are different kinds of Injunctions that may provide you with protection against Violence and protection against Stalking or Harassment. 

On the other hand, in some cases, you may find yourself defending against a partner who uses the legal justice system as a weapon to  further gain control. 

 

The first step you must take is sharing your experience with a trustworthy person and shine the light on the truth.

Under Florida law, an unmarried mother is the natural legal parent of the child born out of wedlock. An unmarried father who is on the child’s birth certificate does not automatically have parental rights. The unmarried father must establish his parental rights. Parental rights give both parents the legal responsibility to  provide financial support, the right to shared time with the child and parental responsibility of child-rearing.

The legal term for divorce in Florida is Dissolution of Marriage with or without minor dependent children. To get divorced in Florida, either spouse must file a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage with or without minor dependent children and must establish that either spouse has been a legal resident of Florida for a minimum of six months prior to filing for divorce and that the marriage is irretrievably broken. 

Uncontested Divorces vs. Contested Divorces

A “contested divorce” means that a Judge will decide issues such as division of assets and debts, time-sharing and parental responsibility of your minor children, as well as the award of alimony and child support.

An “uncontested divorce” is the process by which all your marital issues are resolved by agreement and memorialized in a Marital Settlement Agreement. Uncontested divorces can reduce the emotional and financial exhaustion from the divorce process. More importantly, an uncontested divorce allows you and your spouse to decide the terms of your divorce and retain control in your life post-divorce.